Everyone sucks when they start. Artists can't paint. Authors can't write. Musicians can't play. Babies don't fall out of the womb knowing how to walk. But, the expectation that they'll be great at the start keeps so many people from beginning in the first place.

You can imagine what you want to create, but don't have the capabilities to produce it. Ira Glass calls this the taste gap. Bridging the gap takes time and effort.

Every time you put your work out into the world you get a bit closer to bridging the gap. If the work sucks, you learn something. If it strikes a chord, you've built one piece of the bridge. If you want to bridge the taste gap, you have to aim for progress not perfection, quantity instead of quality.

If you're a parent, you've experienced the painful torture of a kid learning to play an instrument. My poor parents and sister suffered the sounds of a Tuba for years. When you're initially learning to play, it sounds like loud farts coming out of a big piece of metal. But after subjecting my family to 100's of hours of this, I got better and made all-state band.

Go back and read the earliest works of any writer and you'll see a clear progression. It's not a coincidence that it's usually an author's second, third or fourth book that ends up being wildly successful. Because it's spread like wildfire, we assume it's their first book.

Eventually, you'll reach a point where you've bridge the taste gap. You'll be capable of creating what you can imagine. But then your standards will also go up. There will be a new taste gap.

A few weeks ago, I sent Mars Dorian an email asking him to update the cover for a book that we never published. He replied saying he wanted to redo it because it wasn't up to his current standards. He was working to bridge a new taste gap.

The idea of animating our interviews has been a part of my long term vision since the day we started the Unmistakable Creative. At the time, I didn't have the ability to interview people in a way that would lead to stories worth animating. It's taken almost five years to build an archive of interviews that have the kind of stories that will translate for this purpose.

Even if you become a master of your craft, you're always bridging the taste gap.

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